Students benefit from STEM bursary

Post 105 of 416
Sakhile Ngcobo the chairman of the MKI board (left) and the CEO of the institute Sibusiso Mpungose (right) are pictured with UNIZULU students Sinenkosi Masinga, Sinenhlanhla Mthembu and Velemseni Mayise after the launch of the STEM Bursary fund.

Sakhile Ngcobo the chairman of the MKI board (left) and the CEO of the institute Sibusiso Mpungose (right) are pictured with UNIZULU students Sinenkosi Masinga, Sinenhlanhla Mthembu and Velemseni Mayise after the launch of the STEM Bursary fund.

Three University of Zululand students have vowed to work even harder in their studies to repay the trust placed in them by the Moses Kotane Institute (MKI) which funds their studies. The three students were speaking in Durban last week at the official launch of the STEM bursary fund. The fund assists needy but academically deserving students studying towards qualifications in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). More than 100 high school pupils and students at some of the country’s Tertiary institutions are recipients of the bursary from the Moses Kotane Institute. The three UNIZULU students: Sinenkosi Masinga, Velemseni Mayise and Sinenhlanhla Mthembu. Are also recipients of the sponsorship. Masinga, a first year student pursuing a BSC degree in Physics and Chemistry, was a top achiever in Matric and says his good results secured him the bursary. “I was one of the top three students in my circuit and that is how I was selected. I am really grateful to the Moses Kotane Institute for having given me the opportunity because without such an intervention I would not have been able to pay for my studies. Being given this opportunity means that I have to work very hard”. The sentiments were echoed by Mthembu, a second year student who is studying towards a BSc in Biochemistry and Microbiology. She hopes to inspire other needy students. Mayise, who is studying Computer Science and Mathematics, said he would be “staying at home and doing nothing” were it not for the bursary. “I think this bursary is a first sign that I am destined for success. It also means that I have to work extra hard to ensure that I repay the trust placed on me especially because my dreams were starting to fade away,” he said. Speaking at the launch, Sakhile Ngcobo the chairman of the Moses Kotane Institute board urged the bursary holders not to waste the opportunities they had been given. “Thousands had applied but you were lucky enough to be selected”. Ngcobo said since its formation, the institute had touched many lives through its initiatives which include sending more than 400 students to study in India. He also encouraged the recipients of the bursary to be mentors to those who are less fortunate while also saying that they themselves need to find good mentors. “You need to become leaders. Those we are assisting need to go back and assist others. I am also expecting you to become entrepreneurs. You need to start thinking about creating employment for others,” Ngcobo said.